• Canadian Critical Care Trials Group
    The Canadian Critical Care Trials Group (CCCTG) is a highly collegial group that is dedicated to the pursuit of excellence and advancement of critical care research in Canada.
  • Canadian Critical Care Trials Group
    The CCCTG has are more than 30 research programs underway and over 100 peer-reviewed publications to its credit, with direct impact on clinical practice in critical care.
  • Canadian Critical Care Trials Group
    The Canadian Critical Care Trials Group (CCCTG) is a national organization of more than 300 individuals with research interests in the management of the critically ill patient.
  • Canadian Critical Care Trials Group
    Endorsement by the CCCTG communicates our full commitment to ensure that the work is undertaken in a rigorous and ethical manner, and communicated in a timely and effective way.
Coordinates

Institution

St Michaels Hospital, University of Toronto

City

Toronto

Contact This Member

Jane Batt

I am a Clinician Scientist, Department of Medicine, Division of Respirology, St Michaels Hospital, Toronto and Associate Professor, University of Toronto.

I am a Clinician Scientist, Department of Medicine, Division of Respirology, St Michaels Hospital, Toronto and Associate Professor, University of Toronto, and my research focuses on delineating the molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle wasting and dysfunction in disease and trauma.  The muscle wasting and dysfunction that occurs in critical illness survivors with ICU Acquired weakness, patients with chronic respiratory disease  (e.g. COPD, PAH) and trauma (e.g. peripheral nerve injury), diminishes an individual’s quality of life, and increases their disease morbidity, health resource utilization and health care costs.  We lack therapies that can prevent or achieve a sustainable reversal of muscle wasting and dysfunction in these populations.  To initiate effective treatment and prevention programs it is essential to understand the biology underlying the loss of muscle mass. My research program consists of two components; i) basic science projects that study the molecular biology and signaling networks regulating muscle wasting in animal models and aim to identify the critical and novel mediators of atrophy and ii) translational studies that assess signaling networks and biologic processes identified to be key regulators of muscle atrophy, in human disease.